Mohammad R. K. Mofrad

Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Bioengineering

Molecular Cell Biomechanics Laboratory
208A Stanley Hall #1762
University of California at Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720-1762

(510) 643-8165

 

Email: mofrad@berkeley.edu

Biography and CV

Education

1991 B.A.Sc., Sharif University of Technology

1994 M.A.Sc., University of Waterloo

1999 Ph.D., University of Toronto


Professional Experience

1999 - 2000 Post-Doc, Computer Science Department, University of Toronto
2000 - 2002 Post-Doc, MIT and Harvard Medical School/Mass. General Hospital
2002 - 2004 Principal Research Scientist, Biological and Mechanical Engineering, MIT
2005 - 2010 Assistant Professor, Department of Bioengineering, University of California, Berkeley
2010 - 2013 Associate Professor, Department of Bioengineering, University of California, Berkeley
2011 Visiting Professor, Department of Bioengineering, EPFL, Lausanne, Switzerland
2012 - 2013 Associate Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley
2012 - Present Faculty Scientist, Molecular Biophysics, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab
2012 - 2014 Faculty Director, UC Berkeley Master of Bioengineering (M.Eng) Program
2013 - Present Professor, Departments of Bioengineering and Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley
2014 - 2015 Faculty Co-Director, Berkeley-UCSF Master of Translational Medicine (MTM) Program

 

Research

Multiscale Biomechanics of Cardiovascular Disease and Brain Injury; Molecular and Cellular Mechanobiology; Mechanics of Integrin-Mediated Focal Adhesions; Mechanics of the Nuclear Pore and Nucleocytoplasmic Transport

 

To learn more about Professor Mofrad's research, please visit the Molecular Cell Biomechanics Laboratory website.

Publications

To view a list of Professor Mofrad's publications, please visit the Molecular Cell Biomechanics Laboratory website and PubMed.

Instruction

 

MEc115/MEc216: Molecular Biomechanics and Mechanobiology of the Cell

This course develops and applies scaling laws and the methods of statistical and continuum mechanics to biomechanical phenomena over a range of length scales, from molecular to cellular levels. It is intended for senior undergraduate students and graduate students who have been exposed to differential equations, mechanics and certain aspects of modern biology.

 

ME 211: The Cell as a Machine

This course offers a modular and systems mechanobiology (or “machine”) perspective of the cell. Two vitally important components of the cell machinery will be studied in depth: (1) the integrin-mediated focal adhesions system that enables the cell to adhere to, and communicate mechano-chemical signals with, the extracellular environment, and (2) the nuclear pore complex, a multi-protein gateway for traffic in and out of the nucleus that regulates gene expression and affects protein synthesis. This course is intended for graduate students in Mechanical Engineering. No prior knowledge in Biology is assumed.

 

ME 120: Computational Biomechanics Across Multiple Scales

This course applies the methods of computational modeling and continuum mechanics to biomedical phenomena spanning various length scales ranging from molecular to cellular to tissue and organ levels. The course is intended for upper level undergraduate students who have been exposed to undergraduate continuum mechanics (statics and strength of materials).

 

BioE102: Biomechanics: Analysis and Design

This (junior level undergraduate) course develops and applies the methods of continuum mechanics to biomechanical phenomena over a range of length scales, from cell to tissue and organ levels. It is intended for junior undergraduate students in Bioengineering who have been exposed to undergraduate physics, linear algebra and differential equations. The course will equip the students with a deep understanding of principles of biomechanics. The intuitions gained in this course will guide the design of biomedical devices and help the understanding of biological/medical phenomena in health and disease.

 

BioE104: Biological Transport Phenomena

This course develops and applies scaling laws and the methods of continuum mechanics to biological transport phenomena over a range of length and time scales. It is intended for undergraduate students who have taken a course in differential equations, and an introductory course in physics. Preliminary understanding of biology and physiology is useful but not assumed. Example application areas include biomolecular transport in biological tissues, living organs, and in biomedical microdevices.

 

Students

For a list of Professor Mofrad's students, please visit the Molecular Cell Biomechanics Laboratory website.

Websites